Vikshepas

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December 1, 2019
The sixth vikshepa is avirati, which translates as “absence of renunciation,” or “absence of non-attachment.” Avirati is the result of indulging, of going beyond needs to desires, and of gratifying the senses. It is the opposite to one of the four main sadhanas of Yoga, Vairagya or renunciation. The over-indulging of the senses can be... View Article
December 1, 2019
The fifth vikshepa is alasya, which translates as laziness and sloth. There are different types of laziness. One type is the laziness that arises because the soul becomes more prominent, as not-doing is the quality of the soul whereas activity is the quality of the body. But that is not the type of laziness Patanjali... View Article
December 1, 2019
The fourth vikshepa is pramada, which translates as carelessness, haste and indifference. When do we become careless? When do we do things hastily, with indifference? When we do not take interest. It is the opposite of being careful, the opposite of excelling in whatever we do, from cleaning the bathroom to becoming one with the... View Article
December 1, 2019
The third vikshepa is samsaya, which is usually translated as “doubt,” but there are many words for “doubt” in Sanskrit, shanka being the most common. A more appropriate translation of samsaya is “dilemma” or “indecision.” It is that state of confusion, where we are not clear in our own judgment and decision-making ability. Why? Because... View Article
December 1, 2019
The second of the vikshepas is styana, meaning languor, apathy and mental dullness. Apathy is one of the greatest obstacles to any endeavor, as it is a state in which we waste energy. Our energy is drained, we go round and round in circles, and we may talk a lot but it does not translate... View Article
December 1, 2019
The first of the vikshepas is vyadhi or disease. Here Patanjali means physical disease, where the system is unbalanced and away from ease. Where does disease start? Rarely does it initiate in the physical body itself, unless it is the result of an accident or physical trauma. Generally, it starts in the sheath of prana,... View Article